Nicholas Houfek, Lighting Designer

Nicholas Houfek, Lighting Designer

Nicholas Houfek is a New York City based Lighting Designer working primarily in Music, Theater, and Dance with a strong interest in cultivating a collaborative environment. With ICE, he has designed lighting for: Varese (R)evolution II (Lincoln Center Festival), James Dillon’s Nine Rivers and Composer Portrait: Cage (Miller Theater), ICElabs (Mostly Mozart, BAC), and Lisa Coon’s MESH w/choreography by The Troupe (Mt Tremper Arts). 

In addition to working with ICE, Mr. Houfek has worked with SoPercussion+Matmos (Lincoln Center Festival and Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall) and The Bang on a Can All-Stars (Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall). His work in Theater and Dance include: Deepest Play Ever, The Play about My Dad, The Momentum (Collaboration Town),The Capables, Handbook for an American Revolutionary (Gym at Judson), Coney, Why We Left Brooklyn (Blue Cayote Theater), The Future is Not What it Was (Kindling), Travis and the Brazen Women (ARSNOVA), unFRAMED, (John Jay College, SoloNova), Caucasian Chalk Circle (PPAS), Ian Spencer Bell's Socket and Paste-Up (NYCC Studios), William Isaac’s Kymera Dance, The Threepenny Opera (Marvell Rep). Regional: The 39 Steps, Farragut North (Olney Theatre Center). Co-Lighting Designs include: Li’l Buck and YoYo Ma at (le) Poussin Rouge and the art installation Pharmacaphore with choreography by Silas Reiner at The Storefront for Art and Architecture.

 As an assistant or associate, Mr. Houfek has worked for New York City Ballet, Williamstown Theatre Festival, the Fall for Dance festival at New York City Center, and Lincoln Center festival. Additionally, he has worked as Lighting Supervisor for the Martha Graham Dance Company, ArmitageGone Dance, Deborah Hay, Elisa Monte, 360º Dance, and Jonah Bokaer.

He holds a BFA in Lighting Design from Boston University studying under lighting designer Mark Stanley.

Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Associate

Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Associate

Born in Bucharest, Filipino-American Levy Marcel Ingles Lorenzo, Jr. works at the intersection of music, art, and technology.  On an international scale, his body of work spans custom electronics design, sound engineering, instrument building, installation art, free improvisation, and classical percussion.  With a primary focus on inventing new instruments, he prototypes, composes, and performs new electronic music.  As an electronic art consultant, Levy designs interactive electronics ranging from small sculptures to large-scale public art installations with artists such as Alvin Lucier, Christine Sun Kim, Ligorano-Reese, and Leo Villareal.  As a percussionist, he co-founded the experimental theater/electronics duo Radical 2 with Dennis Sullivan and performs regularly with improvisor Peter Evans.  As a sound engineer, he specializes in the realization and performance of complete electro-acoustic concerts with non-traditional configurations.  One of his main engagements is Claire Chase’s Density 2036 project.  A core member of acclaimed the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), he fulfills multiple roles as live sound engineer, electronic artist, and percussionist.

Filling a unique niche, Levy is in demand as a freelance designer and artist.  His work has been featured at STEIM, Harvestworks, MIT Media Lab, Ensemble Moderne, Darmstadt, Yellow Barn, Pitchfork.com, Slashdot.org, G4TV, Grey Group, Bose, The New York Times, BBC, and Burning Man.  An advocate for interdisciplinary arts, he has collaborated with dancers, video artists, public artists, mathematicians, sculptors, engineers, and dramaturgs. Bridging the gap between the electronics design cycle and the performance practice of cutting-edge contemporary music, Levy is as equally comfortable wielding a soldering iron as drumsticks and four-mallets.  He has fluency navigating hardware schematics and coding in various software environments, as well as interpreting complex musical scores and playing chamber music.

Levy earned degrees as Master of Electrical & Computer Engineering from Cornell University, and Doctor of Percussion Performance from Stony Brook University.  He has given numerous guest lectures on electronic musical instrument design both domestically and internationally.  Professor Lorenzo teaches electronics and coding at CUNY College of Technology, as well as Music Technology Performance at Hunter College.  He recently received commissions from the American Composers Forum and Pringles.  This season, Levy is scheduled to officially release the iLophone, a new chamber app instrument for iOS.

www.levylorenzo.com

 

Peter Tantsits, tenor

Peter Tantsits, tenor

Tenor Peter Tantsits has earned an international reputation for his dramatic flair, keen musicianship, and ability to fearlessly embrace the most stratospheric vocal writing of the 20th and 21st centuries. Always eager to push the boundaries of the lyric tenor repertoire, he was recently named “one of his generation’s most consistently satisfying contemporary vocal music specialists” by OPERA Magazine (UK). Peter is often called upon to perform the modern classics of the 20th century such as Berg and Ligeti as well as new works, particularly evidenced by recent success on the stages of Teatro alla Scala, Lincoln Center, and the Beijing International Music Festival.  Performing with ICE since its inception, Peter has collaborated with the ensemble on works by composers such as Berio, Birtwistle, Gubaidulina, Kagel, Ligeti, Nono, Rihm, Ustvolskaya, and Xenakis in addition to new works.   

On the operatic stage, Peter has been praised by the British publication Opera Now for his “luminous timbre” and ability to craft a role with “astute understanding.“ Opera News has cited his “gifted, agile and expressive” singing with “vibrant, penetrating beauty while managing the complexities of his role with complete mastery and infallibly good diction.”  The 2010/2011 season marks his debut with the London Symphony Orchestra at the Barbican Centre, the Munich Philharmonic at the Kulturzentrum Gasteig, and the China Philharmonic at the Beijing International Music Festival, as well as returning to the New York Philharmonic for Doug Fitch’s production of Janacek’s The Cunning Little Vixen. He sings the central role of Colin McPhee in Evan Ziporyn’s opera A House in Bali at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and Boston’s Cutler Majestic Theater as well as reprising the high tenor role of Xu Xian in Robert Woodruff’s production of Zhou Long’s Madame White Snake in Beijing and creating the central role in Du Yun’s Angel’s Bone for Philadelphia’s Mann Center for the Performing Arts. Premieres include Michael LaCroix’s adaptation of Aristophanes’ The Birds with eighth blackbird in Chicago and Marcos Balter’s Aesopica at the Morgan Library with the ICE. His concert engagements this season also include Carmina Burana (one of his signature roles) with the Oberlin Orchestra. Among his engagements for 2011/2012, Peter looks forward performing John Worthing for the European premiere of Gerald Barry’s The Importance of Being Earnest with Thomas Adès at the Barbican in London, returning to Opera Boston to sing Mark in the regional premiere of Tippett’s A Midsummer Marriage, debuting in Paris at the Théâtre du Châtelet with Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France in Le Grand Macabre and returning to China for additional performances of Madame White Snake in the opera houses of Guangzhou and Hangzhou.

A "fearless high tenor" (Opernwelt), Peter recently made a successful debut at La Scala in Milan singing the high tenor role of Syme in Robert Lepage’s production of Lorin Maazel’s 1984. He has worked with some of the world’s top orchestras collaborating with conductors Alan Gilbert, Lorin Maazel, Leonard Slatkin, Kristjan Järvi, Leon Botstein, Emmanuelle Haïm, Gil Rose and Philip Walsh. He made two acclaimed appearances with the New York Philharmonic in 2008 and 2010 (both broadcast nationally) and also performed with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Niederösterreich at Vienna’s Konzerthaus, the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie at Bremen’s Die Glocke, the National Symphony at the Kennedy Center and the American Symphony Orchestra at Lincoln Center.

Identified by the New York Times as an "appealing," "versatile" and "adventurous high tenor," Peter’s repertoire ranges from Rossini’s La Cenerentola and Rameau’s Platée to Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabre and Xenakis’s Oresteia. Two core works in his concert repertoire include Carmina Burana and Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde in addition to works by Bach, Britten, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Charpentier, and Clérambault. He has performed in a number of international festivals including Britain’s Aldeburgh Festival, the Festival Lyrique-en-mer in France, and the Festival Internacional de Musica Contemporánea in Morelia. Also of note are his performances as Tony in West Side Story in the Middle East for the Centrepoint Theatre in Dubai and his collaboration with the Mark Morris Dance Group and Moving Theater.

Peter originally trained as a violinist and earned degrees from Yale University and the Oberlin Conservatory.

email Peter

Tony Arnold, soprano

Tony Arnold, soprano

John von Rhein of the Chicago Tribune writes, “anything sung by soprano Tony Arnold is worth hearing.” Hailed by the New York Times as “a bold and powerful interpreter,” she has gained international acclaim for sparkling and insightful performances of the most daunting contemporary scores. In 2001, Ms. Arnold was thrust into the international spotlight when she became the only vocalist ever to be awarded first prize in the Gaudeamus Interpreters Competition. On the heels of that triumph, she claimed first prize in the 15th Louise D. McMahon International Music Competition. Since that time, Ms. Arnold has established a reputation as a leading specialist in new vocal repertoire, receiving consistent critical accolades for her many recordings, as well as performances with groups such as the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s MusicNOW, Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group, New York New Music Ensemble, Ensemble 21, eighth blackbird, Contempo, Orchestra of St. Lukes, Boston Modern Orchestra Project, Fulcrum Point, and many others.

Ms. Arnold has been a frequent guest at international festivals in the USA, Mexico, Germany, Armenia, Finland, Switzerland, Italy, and Korea. She was a featured artist at the 2008 Darmstadt International Music Festival, the premier contemporary music venue of Europe. She tours regularly as a member of the George Crumb Ensemble. With violin virtuoso Movses Pogossian, she has taken György Kurtág’s Kafka Fragments to more than 30 venues across the United States, Canada, Europe, and Asia. A DVD/CD set of their performance was released in 2009 on Bridge Records, to great critical acclaim.

In addition to Kafka Fragments, Ms. Arnold’s many recordings include a 2006 Grammy Nominated performance of George Crumb’s Ancient Voices of Children on Bridge Records. Released in 2009 was a DVD of the music of Crumb with the composer. She collaborated with conductor Robert Craft on a CD of vocal works by Anton Webern on the Naxos label. She has also recorded music of Carter, Babbitt, Wolpe and Tania León for Bridge; Berio’s Sequenza III for Naxos; and Kaija Saariaho’s Adjö on New Focus Records.

Ms. Arnold is an active participant in the creation and commissioning of new music. As the 2009 Howard Hanson Distinguished Professor of American Music at the Eastman School, Ms. Arnold shepherded the creation and premiere performances of new vocal music by 15 student composers. Recent premieres have included works by Philippe Manoury, Jason Eckardt, David Liptak, and Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon. During the summers, Ms. Arnold engages composers and singers in music written by the participants of the SoundSCAPE Festival in Maccagno, Italy. Since 2003 she has served on the faculty of the University at Buffalo, where she founded the extended vocal techniques ensemble, BABEL.

Ms. Arnold is a graduate of Oberlin College and Northwestern University. Among her many mentors, she is greatly indebted to her study with sopranos Carmen Mehta and Carol Webber, and conductors Robert Spano and Victor Yampolsky.

Read more about Tony Arnold at www.screecher.com

Dan Peck, tuba

Dan Peck, tuba

Dan Peck is a tubist, improviser, and composer living in New York since 2005. He performs
regularly with contemporary ensembles such as ICE and Wet Ink, and has also played with
the New York Philharmonic, Metropolitan Opera, and New York City Ballet. As an improviser,
Dan has toured Europe and played at international festivals with his own doom jazz trio
The Gate, as well as with Ingrid Laubrock and Anthony Braxton. He currently teaches
at New Jersey City University. His record label, Tubapede Records, releases new and experimental
media from the NY area and beyond.

Photo credits: Steve Singer (inset) and Peter Gannushkin

Michael Lormand, trombone

Michael Lormand, trombone

 New York City-based trombonist Mike Lormand is a devoted performer of eclectic contemporary and classical music in solo, chamber, and orchestral settings. A member of the International Contemporary Ensemble and Paragon Ragtime Orchestra, Mike also performs with Talea Ensemble, Argento Chamber Ensemble, Manhattan Brass and TILT Brass. In 2012, Mike created Weather Vest, a mixed-wind quartet that explores commonality between classical chamber music, small group jazz, and folk music.

Mike’s continuing commitment to engaging orchestral repertoire has led to performances with Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra, The Knights, American Symphony Orchestra, New York City Ballet, New York City Opera and Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. As a soloist, Mike has commissioned and premiered numerous new works in an effort to enrich the trombone repertoire. He has performed at the American Trombone Workshop and International Trombone Festival.

As a brass instructor at St. Ann’s School in Brooklyn, Mike enjoys connecting students to lasting personal relationships with music, sharing insights taught to him by his teachers, Per Brevig, Dave Taylor, Marta Hofacre and Bob Schmaltz. Mike is a graduate of Manhattan School of Music (MM) and University of Southern Mississippi (BM).

David Byrd-Marrow, horn

David Byrd-Marrow, horn

Atlanta, Georgia native David Byrd-Marrow received his Bachelor's degree from The Juilliard School, where he studied with the late Jerome Ashby. For his Master's degree, David went on to study with William Purvis at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He was then selected for fellowship in the Juilliard-Carnegie Hall Academy Ensemble ACJW. David has also played with groups such as Carnegie Hall's "Zankel Band," The Orchestra of St. Luke's, The Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, The Tokyo Symphony, The New York and Atlanta Operas and The New York Philharmonic.

Gareth Flowers, trumpet

Gareth Flowers, trumpet

Originally from Arlington, Virginia, Gareth Flowers is an electro-acoustic trumpeter, know for "shimmering vibrato" and "wide-ranging lines" (The New York Times, June 2010). He has performed with ICE since 2003.

Although his musical journey has included performances with the major orchestras of New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Seoul, he relishes making music on an intimate scale, and performs with ICE, the TILT Creative Brass band, the Argento New Music Project, and the Tri-Centric Foundation’s (Anthony Braxton) orchestra. He often performs in theatrical productions on Broadway, and has recorded for many fine musicians including Gabriel Kahane, Anthony Coleman, and duYun.

As a composer-performer, he has had his own eccentric electro-acoustic Inventions performed at the Clark Studio Theater of Lincoln Center and at the Tank, and his electro-acoustic trumpet and laptop duo, the Batteries Duo, has performed at Issue Project Room, Bargemusic, and Cornelia Street Café.

Gareth received his Master of Music and Bachelor of Music degrees from the Juilliard School, where he studied with Raymond Mase and Mark Gould. He also recently joined the faculty of Columbia University’s Music Department.

Peter Evans, trumpet

Peter Evans, trumpet

Peter Evans is a trumpet player and improvisor/compose,r based in New York City since 2003.   Evans is part of a broad, hybridized scene of musical experimentation and his work cuts across a wide range of modern musical practices and traditions.  Peter is committed to the simultaneously self-determining and collaborative nature of musical improvisation as a compositional tool, and works with an ever-expanding group of musicians and composers in the creation of new music.  His primary groups as a leader are the Peter Evans Quintet and the Zebulon trio.  In addition, Evans has been performing and recording solo trumpet music since 2002 and is widely recognized as a leading voice in the field, having released several recordings over the past decade.  He is a member of the cooperative groups  Pulverize the Sound (with Mike Pride and Tim Dahl) and Rocket Science (with Evan Parker, Craig Taborn and Sam Pluta) and is constantly experimenting and forming new configurations with like minded players.  As a composer, he has been commissioned by the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), Yarn/Wire, the Donaueschingen Musiktage Festival, the Jerome Foundation's Emerging Artist Program, and the Doris Duke Foundation for the 2015 Newport Jazz Festival. Evans has presented and/or performed his works at major festivals worldwide and tours his own groups extensively.  He has worked with some of the leading figures in new music:  John Zorn, Kassa Overall, Jim Black, Weasel Walter, Levy Lorenzo, Nate Wooley, Steven Schick, Mary Halvorson, Joe McPhee, and performs with both ICE and the Wet Ink Ensemble. He has been releasing recordings on his own label, More is More, since 2011.

Nathan Davis, percussion

Nathan Davis, percussion

Inspired by natural phenomena and the abstraction of simple stories, composer and percussionist Nathan Davis "writes music that deals deftly and poetically with timbre and sonority" (NYTimes), elucidating the acoustics of instruments and the fragile athleticism of playing them.

The BAM Next Wave Festival and American Opera Projects presented the world premiere of Davis’ Hagoromo, a chamber dance-opera featuring the International Contemporary Ensemble, soloists Katalin Karolyi and Peter Tantsits, the Brooklyn Youth Chorus, and featuring dancers Wendy Whelan and Jock Soto. Lincoln Center inaugurated its Tully Scope Festival with the premiere of Nathan's landmark work Bells and presented other premieres of his work at the 2013 Mostly Mozart Festival. Nathan has written many other works for the ICE and its members, and has received commissions from Steven Schick, the La Jolla Symphony Chorus, Miller Theatre, the Ojai Festival, Third Coast Percussion, MATA, Yarn/Wire, and Donaueschinger Musiktage. 

Nathan spent Winter 2016 as a Fellow at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. He has also received awards from the Fromm Foundation, Meet The Composer, American Music Center New Music for Dance, Aaron Copland Fund, Jerome Foundation, and New Music USA. He and Phyllis Chen won an NY Innovative Theater Award for their score to Sylvia Milo's play The Other Mozart.

An active percussionist, Davis has premiered hundreds of pieces, working with luminaries and fostering emerging composers. He has appeared as a concerto soloist with the Seattle Symphony, Tokyo Symphony, and Nagoya Philharmonic. He performs regularly at major venues throughout NYC, across the US and Europe, and has toured Russia, Bali, Turkey, and Cuba. He has recorded for Nonesuch, Tzadik, Mode, Kairos, New Albion, Bridge, BMOP, and Cold Blue records.

Performances of his compositions have been presented at Carnegie Hall, BAM Harvey Theater, Miller Theatre, Merkin Hall, Symphony Space, The Kitchen, Roulette, Le Poisson Rouge, the Stone, Issue Project Room, the Park Avenue Armory, and the Look and Listen Festival. His music was featured in portrait concerts at Spoleto Festival USA and Mount Tremper Arts, and it has been performed across the country by the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, the Calder Quartet, the CSO MusicNOW, and many soloists. International performances have been heard at Acht Brücken Köln, Aspekte Salzburg, Helsinki Musica Nova, Darmstadt, Audio Art Krakow, and other festivals in Holland, China, Canada, Mexico, Cuba, and Australia.  

Albums of Nathan’s music include On the Nature of Thingness and The Bright and Hollow Sky (performed by ICE and one of TimeOut NY's top 5 classical albums of 2011), flutist Claire Chase's debut AlientoTravel Diary from the Meehan/Perkins Duo, Simple Songs from Doug Perkins, 100 Names from Rebekah Heller, Little Things from Phyllis Chen, and his electroacoustic percussion disc Memory Spaces.

Davis served on the faculty of Dartmouth College for eight years and has given masterclasses on composition, electronics, and extended percussion techniques at UC Berkeley, CalArts, Rice, Baylor, Yale, and the Akademia Muzyczna in Krakow, Poland, with additional residencies at Harvard, Princeton, UCSD, Brown, and other universities across North America. Nathan received his Masters in Music from Yale University, Bachelors degrees in both composition and percussion at Rice University, and was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to study at the Rotterdams Conservatorium in Holland.

www.nathandavis.com

 

Cory Smythe, piano

Cory Smythe, piano

Pianist Cory Smythe is a graduate of the music schools at Indiana University and the University of Southern California.

As a member of ICE, he has contributed to many premieres, worked with composers Philippe Hurel, Magnus Lindberg, and David Lang among others, and performed in many venues across the U.S. and abroad. Cory has contributed frequently to the Boston-based Firebird Ensemble, Milwaukee's Present Music, and the New York Miniaturist Ensemble.

A frequent collaborator with other artists, Cory recently appeared at chamber music festivals in Bloomington, IN and Salem, NY, at the Ravinia Rising Stars series with violinist Tim Fain, and made his Carnegie Weill Hall debut with violinist Sung-Ju Lee. As an improviser and jazz musician, Cory has performed with the Greg Osby Four, with Pete Robbins Centric, and in drummer/composer Tyshawn Sorey's quartet, whose album "That/Not" (Firehouse 12) was named the 2007 best debut album in the Village Voice jazz critics poll. Cory’s principal teachers have included Luba Edlina-Dubinsky and Stewart Gordon.

 

Phyllis Chen, piano

Phyllis Chen, piano

Praised by The New York Times for her "delightful quirkiness matched with interpretive sensitivity," Phyllis Chen is a pianist, toy pianist and multimedia artist that performs original multimedia compositions and works by contemporary composers. The Chicago Reader says that Phyllis has "become one of the world's leading proponents of the toy piano." Her artistic pursuits take her in numerous directions as a toy pianist, pianist, and composer, leading to her selection as a New Music/New Places Fellow at the 2007 Concert Artist Guild International Competition. The LA Times simply states, "she is a bold pianist with an excellent sense of color."

Phyllis founded the UnCaged Toy Piano, a composition competition to further expand the repertoire for toy piano and electronics. The competition has received works from composers all around the world and these compositions become an integral part of her repertoire. A strong interest in interdisciplinary work led her to collaborations with video artist and electronic musician Rob Dietz with whom she created multimedia works such as The Memoirist, Pearlessence, Chroma and Carousel. The two of them are interested in co-creating new works that rethink the idea of live art and performance using music and visuals.

Recently, Phyllis was the featured solo musician for the world premiere of Stephin Merritt's Off-Broadway production, Coraline in May 2009 at the Lucille Lortel Theater in New York City. In this unique on-stage performance, Phyllis was the show's sole instrumentalist as a multi-keyboardist, big and small. Other recent premieres include a commissioned work by American ICE composer/percussionist Nathan Davis for toy piano and clock chimes premiered at Symphony Space as part of the Concert Artist Guild New Music/New Places Series. In May 2010, Phyllis will be premiering a new work "Whatever Shall Be" for toy piano, MAX/MSP, music box, gadgets and quadrophonic sound set-up by Austrian composer, Karlheinz Essl. The work will be premiered as part of the Look & Listen Festival in New York City.

Playing an instrument that has no set boundaries or genres, Phyllis has been invited to perform at a large variety of festivals and concerts, including the Chicago World Music Festival and Lotus World Music Festival, the distinguished Gilmore International Keyboard Festival and Portland Piano International.

Lauded for playing Beethoven 1st Concerto "with amazing grace, with enviable clarity, and with finger work of both strength and elasticity" (The Herald Times, IN), Ms. Chen's traditional piano credits include honors at the International Bartok/Kabalevsky Piano and the Coleman Chamber Music Competition. Her victory at the Marjorie Barnett Competition of Chicago included a special Bach Prize for her performance of the Goldberg Variations, and as a result, Phyllis was invited to perform at Chicago Symphony Center's Buntrock Hall.She also performed on the Dame Myra Hess Series at the Chicago Cultural Center, aired live on WFMT Public Radio.

Phyllis attended Oberlin Conservatory as a recipient of the Dean's Talent Award Scholarship and received a Masters Degree from Northwestern University as an Eckstein Merit Scholar. She is continuing to pursue her DMA in piano performance at Indiana University where she studied with André Watts. Phyllis currently resides in Astoria, New York.

For more information, www.phyllischen.net

Nuiko Wadden, harp

Nuiko Wadden, harp

Nuiko Wadden is the principal harpist of Pittsburgh Opera and Ballet Orchestras as well as the Des Moines Metro Opera. She is also a member of both the janus trio, based out of Brooklyn, and the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE).

Ms. Wadden has been a prizewinner in numerous competitions, recognized in the Minnesota Orchestra (WAMSO), Ann Adams, ASTA, and American Harp Society competitions. As a soloist she has appeared with the Skokie Valley Symphony, the Chicago Metropolitan Symphony, Oberlin Orchestra, and Shepherd School Chamber Orchestra. She made her professional debut as soloist with the Minnesota Orchestra this past January.

Bridget Kibbey, harp

Bridget Kibbey, harp

According to the New York Times, Harpist Bridget Kibbey "makes it seem as though her instrument had been waiting all its life to explode with the gorgeous colors and energetic figures she was getting from it." Bridget is a recipient of the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant, the Classical Recording Foundation's 2012 Young Artist Award, and winner of Concert Artist Guild's International Competition and Astral Artist Auditions. Bridget's debut album, Love is Come Again, was named one of the Top Ten Releases by Time Out New York. This season she is featured with Placido Domingo in his most recent album for SONY Records, Encanto del Mare. She may also be heard on Deutsche Grammaphon with Dawn Upshaw, on a recording of Osvaldo Golijov’s Ayre and Luciano Berio’s Folk Songs.  Ms. Kibbey's solo performances have been broadcast on NPR's Performance Today, on New York's WQXR, WNYC's Soundcheck, WETA’s Front Row Washington, WRTI’s Crossover, and A&E's Breakfast with the Arts. 

Bridget recently spearheaded a five-orchestra World-Premiere Harp Concerto Consortium, for which she performed a new harp concerto by Juno-Award winning Vivian Fung alongside standard harp concerti with the Alabama Symphony, Karlsruhe Badische Symphoniker, The Phillips Collection with the Phillips Camerata, San José Chamber Orchestra, and the Metropolis Ensemble. She is frequently featured with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in Alice Tully Hall and on tour, and was recently named a Principal Artist with Camerata Pacifica, with whom she will be featured on the West Coast of the United States during the next five seasons. 

Festival appearances this past season include Bravo!Vail, Savannah Music Festival, Music@Menlo, Chamber Music Northwest, Portland Chamber Music Festival, Pelotas Festival (Brazil), Bay Chamber Concerts, Saratoga Performing Arts Center, among others.

Ms. Kibbey is a graduate of The Juilliard School, where she studied with Nancy Allen. She is on the harp faculties of Bard Conservatory, New York University, and the Juilliard Pre-College program.

Daniel Lippel, guitar

Daniel Lippel, guitar

Guitarist Daniel Lippel, called an “exciting soloist” (New York Times), “precise and sensitive” (Boston Globe) and a "formidable guitarist" (Chicago Magazine) enjoys a unique and diverse career that ranges through solo and chamber music performances, innovative commissioning and recording projects, and performances in diverse contexts. He has premiered more than fifty new solo and chamber works, many written for him, recording several on the independent label he co-founded and directs, New Focus Recordings. Lippel has been the resident guitarist for ICE since 2005, and has been a guest with many ensembles as well, including the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, New York New Music Ensemble, Either/Or Ensemble, Dinosaur Annex, counter(induction, Argento New Music Project, and Cygnus Ensemble. He is a founding member of new music quartet Flexible Music. Featured solo appearances include The Greene Space at WNYC, premiere of William Anderson's Djuna Barnes Settings for soprano, two plucked strings, and orchestra with the Riverside Symphony at Merkin Hall, and the premiere of Dai Fujikura's Sparking Orbit with the SWR Electronic Studio at the ZKM in Karlsruhe (Germany). Recent and upcoming recital highlights include the Sinus Ton Festival (Germany), the New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, and Triangle (N.C.) classical guitar societies, University of Texas at San Antonio, Tangents Guitar Series at the Center for New Music in San Francisco, and the Cleveland International Guitar Festival (CIM). As a chamber musician, Lippel has performed at the Macau Music Festival (China), the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center, Aspekte Festival (Austria), Teatro Amazonas (Manaus, Brasil), Sibelius Academy (Finland), Acht Brücken Festival (Cologne, Germany), Ojai Music Festival, and Zankel and Weill Halls at Carnegie Hall, as well as on the Monadnock, Cooperstown, Bay Chamber, and Alpenglow chamber music festivals. He has worked closely with many eminent composers including Mario Davidovsky, John Zorn, Ursula Mamlok, and Nils Vigeland, and also collaborated on new works with several of contemporary music’s most active mid-career composers.

In addition to New Focus, he has recorded for several labels including Kairos, Tzadik, Bridge, Albany, Centaur, and Starkland. Lippel is an active performer in non-classical contexts as well, having performed solo sets of his own music for amplified classical guitar and effects at Tokyo's O-Nest, Paris' Café de la Danse, Krakow's Unsound Festival, and the Knitting Factory in New York. As a member of the eclectic indie group Mice Parade, Lippel appeared on the Fuji Rock Festival (Japan), Sydney Festival (Australia), Bestival (U.K.), as well as on numerous tours throughout North America, Europe, and Asia. His performances in improvised contexts include long term duo collaborations with instrumentalist/composers Aidan Plank, Martin Moretto, and Cory Smythe. 

As an educator, Lippel is particularly interested in demystifying the contemporary repertoire for guitarists, and the guitar for composers. He has given masterclasses and presentations to guitar departments at several institutions including the Hanns Eisler Hochschule in Berlin, Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, Sydney Conservatorium of Music (Australia), San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and guest lecture presentations to composition departments at the University of Texas at Austin, DePaul University, New York University, and University of California at Davis, as well as a presentation to the 2016 Guitar Foundation of America conference on guitar and electronics repertoire. His articles have been published by Soundboard and Guitar Review. Lippel was on faculty at Bowling Green State University in Ohio teaching classical guitar from 1999-2001. He received the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree from the Manhattan School of Music, under the guidance of David Starobin, writing his dissertation on the guitar works of Mario Davidovsky. His earlier teachers included Nicholas Goluses, David Leisner, John Holmquist, and Jason Vieaux.

 

Campbell MacDonald, clarinet

Campbell MacDonald, clarinet

Seattle native Campbell MacDonald is a founding member of the International Contemporary Ensemble and Principal Clarinet of the Fort Wayne Philharmonic. Prior to moving to Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 2004, Campbell held positions in the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra, the Michigan Opera Theatre Orchestra in Detroit, and spent six summers in Mexico City as Solo Clarinetist of La Orquésta Sinfónica de Minería. Mr. MacDonald's uncommonly varied musical activities include regular performances as a solo and chamber music recitalist, concerto soloist, compositional collaborator, studio recording artist, and educator.  

Campbell has appeared with orchestras in Detroit, Indianapolis, and Grand Rapids, and has performed with the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble, Alarm Will Sound, NOW Ensemble, the Seattle Chamber Players, and the Detroit Chamber Winds and Strings. Performance credits of note include Wien Modern (Vienna), Aspekte Festival (Salzburg), Festival Fringe (Edinburgh), the Huddersfield Festival (England), the Lincoln Center Festival, the Mostly Mozart Festival, the Ojai Music Festival, Da Camera Houston, and the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival. Additionally, he has performed at the Library of Congress (DC), L.A. Opera’s REDCAT, EMPAC (Troy, NY), the Green Music Center (Sonoma, CA), Chicago's Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of New York. Campbell’s educational residencies and performances include concerts at Columbia University, Boston Conservatory, the Hartt School, and Harvard University. His recorded work can be heard on the Naxos, Koch, Nonesuch, Tzadik and New Focus labels.  

Mr. MacDonald earned a Bachelor of Music degree from Oberlln College Conservatory of Music and attended graduate school at DePaul University in Chicago. He studied clarinet with Larry Combs, David Weber, Lawrence McDonald, and Laura DeLuca.

James Austin Smith, oboe

James Austin Smith, oboe


Praised for his “virtuosic,” “dazzling" and “brilliant” performances (The New York Times) and his “bold, keen sound” (The New Yorker), oboist James Austin Smith performs equal parts new and old music across the United States and around the world.  Mr. Smith is an artist of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), the Talea Ensemble and Cygnus as well as co-Artistic Director of Decoda, the Affiliate Ensemble of Carnegie Hall. He is a member of the faculties of the Manhattan School of Music and the State University of New York at Purchase and is co-Artistic Director of Tertulia, a chamber music series that takes place in restaurants in New York and San Francisco.

Mr. Smith’s festival appearances include Marlboro, Lucerne, Chamber Music Northwest, Schleswig-Holstein, Stellenbosch, Bay Chamber Concerts, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, OK Mozart, Schwetzingen and Spoleto USA; he has performed with the St. Lawrence, Orion and Parker string quartets and recorded for the Nonesuch, Bridge, Mode and Kairos labels.  His debut solo recording "Distance" was released in early 2015 on South Africa's TwoPianists Record Label.

Mr. Smith received his Master of Music degree in 2008 from the Yale School of Music and graduated in 2005 with Bachelor of Arts (Political Science) and Bachelor of Music degrees from Northwestern University.  He spent a year as a Fulbright Scholar in Leipzig, Germany at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater "Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy” and is an alumnus of Ensemble ACJW, a collaboration of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, the Weill Music Institute and the New York City Department of Education.  Mr. Smith’s principal teachers are Stephen Taylor, Christian Wetzel, Humbert Lucarelli and Ray Still.

The son of musician parents and eldest of four boys, Mr. Smith was born in New York and raised in Connecticut.

Nicholas Masterson, oboe

Nicholas Masterson, oboe

Oboist Nicholas Masterson has been a member of the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) since 2006. With ICE, Nick has recorded John Adam's Son of Chamber Symphony for Nonesuch records and has appeared as a soloist with the Seattle and Nagoya Symphonies performing Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante and Dai Fujikura's Mina for Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Percussion and Orchestra.

In addition to being Principal Oboe of the Pennsylvania Ballet Orchestra and a member of the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra,  Nick also performs regularly with numerous orchestras and chamber ensembles across the country including the Philadelphia Orchestra, New Jersey and Houston Symphonies and the St. Paul and Orpheus Chamber Orchestras. He is a graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory and received his Master's from Rice University. 

Randall Zigler, bass

Randall Zigler, bass

Randall Zigler began his bass studies as a high school student in St. Louis, Missouri and attended Oberlin College shortly thereafter, where he received undergraduate degrees in bass performance and mathematics. He has since received a Master of Music degree from Boston University, and continues to freelance as an orchestral and chamber musician throughout New England.

Recently appointed Principal Bass of the New Haven Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Zigler is also principal of the New Hampshire Symphony Orchestra and performs regularly with the Rhode Island Philharmonic and New Bedford Symphony Orchestra, among others. In addition, he continues to pursue his goals in the performance of contemporary works, having performed with a wide variety of ensembles and premiered solo works by ICE members Du Yun and David Reminick.

He has been a member of ICE since its inception.

Michael Nicolas, cello

Michael Nicolas, cello

A “long-admired figure on the New York scene” (New Yorker), cellist Michael Nicolas enjoys a diverse career as chamber musician, soloist, recording artist, and improvisor. His eclectic tastes and adventurous spirit have led him to forge a musical path of uncommon breadth, where his activities range from performing the masterpieces of the past in the world's most prestigious concert halls, to free improvisation in a downtown New York experimental venue with giants of the genre, to working with contemporary composers of all styles, pushing the boundaries of musical expression and meaning.

The ensembles Michael plays in illustrate his commitment to diversity. He is the cellist of the intrepid and genre-defying string quartet Brooklyn Rider, which has drawn praise from classical, world music, and rock critics alike. As a member of the acclaimed International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), he has worked with countless composers from around the world, premiering and recording dozens of new works. Another group, Third Sound, which Michael helped found, made its debut with an historic residency at the 2015 Havana Contemporary Music Festival, in Cuba.

As a soloist, Michael performs recitals and concertos across the globe. His album Transitions, available on the Sono Luminus label, was named Q2 Music Album of the Week at WQXR upon release, and it has since garnered critical acclaim across North America. His chamber music playing can also be found on the Naxos, Tzadik, and Universal Korea labels.

Of mixed French-Canadian and Taiwanese heritage, Michael was born in Canada, and currently resides in New York City. He is a graduate of the Juilliard School.

michaelnicolascellist.com

Katinka Kleijn, cello

Katinka Kleijn, cello

Called “Chicago’s first lady of the cello” by Timeout Chicago Magazine, Dutch cellist Katinka Kleijn is a member of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the International Contemporary Ensemble. In demand as soloist, she performed with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under Charles Dutoit in Penderecki’s Triple Cello Concerto, as well as with the The Hague Philharmonic, the Chicago Sinfonietta , the Illinois Philharmonic, the China Broadcasting Chinese Orchestra, and as a soloist in Mark-Anthony Turnage’s Kaion the CSO’s MusicNOW Series. 

She appeared in chamber music collaborations with Yo Yo Ma, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Christoph Eschenbach, Richard Goode, Lynn Harrell, Jeremy Denk, at the Marlboro Music Festival, Chicago’s Symphony Center Presents Series, and in recital at the Library of Congress.

Kleijn presented her solo show “oil-free blush” at the Chicago Humanities Festival, highlighting the carcinogenic properties of makeup, which included seven premieres. A collaboration with the Chicago-based performance art duo Industry of the Ordinary resulted in the highly-acclaimed and publicized work “Intelligence in the Human-Machine” by Daniel Dehaan, which Time magazine called “a balancing act for Kleijn’s whole body,” and where Kleijn performs a duet with her own brainwaves.

In Kleijn’s extensive work as a member of the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), she has given many premieres, including the first American performance of Zona for solo cello and ensemble by Magnus Lindberg at the Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival, and Eternal Escape for solo cello by Dai Fujikura.

Kleijn recorded for Naxos, Boston Records, David Baker’s Cello Concerto with the Chicago Sinfonietta on the Cedille label, with the progrock band District 97, the ambient-folk duo Relax Your Ears, singer-song writer David Sylvian, and has a working duo with guitarist Bill MacKay. 

Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello

Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello

While all the other kids were learning addition in first grade, Kivie Cahn-Lipman was running around the classroom singing that he was a yeti. His kindly teacher said he was very musical, so Kivie was allowed his choice of instruments along with the therapy. He told his parents he wanted to play the drums, so they asked him what instrument he REALLY wanted to play. "The tuba," he replied, and they handed him a violin. In Kivie's first violin lesson, his teacher allowed him to look at but not touch the instrument, and he learned the names of its parts, and he was taught to respect the violin. In his second lesson he was allowed to look at but not touch the instrument, and he learned a little about how to read music, and more about how to respect the violin. In his third lesson he was allowed to touch but not pick up the instrument, and he learned more about reading music, and he was lectured again about respecting the violin. He picked his nose and wiped it on the violin, and then that teacher went away andKivie's parents gave him a cello. And when he picked his nose and wiped it on the cello, the new teacher was like "ewww gross don't do that, here's a tissue, clean that up and let's play music," and that seemed like a good idea.

Eventually Kivie went to Oberlin and then Juilliard, and after awhile each school gave him a fancy document written in Latin that hopefully indicates that he graduated. He finished up his education at the University of Cincinnati, and he's a doctor now. Not that kind of doctor. Since its founding in 2001, Kivie has been the cellist of the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE). He served on the faculties of Smith College and Mount Holyoke College from 2005–2012, and he now teaches at the College of New Jersey and every summer at the Cortona Sessions for New Music. 

Kivie started his own Baroque ensemble called ACRONYM (the Altmusik Collective Radiating from Oberlin via New York, Mostly,www.acronymensemble.com), and he finds long-forgotten music in old manuscripts and transcribes it, and they give the first performances of it in hundreds of years; they've got seven CDs of modern premieres recorded and more on the way. His 2014 solo recording of J.S. Bach's cello suites got a nice blurb in a trade publication called The Strad, but he's way more proud of the warm personal letter praising the disc which he received from Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Kivie's mom also liked the recording, and maybe a few other people did too. You can find it on sale wherever you can still find music on sale, and the discs make great coasters.

Also, a recent review in the New York Times noted that "his long, flowing hair often covered his face as he played."  Seriously, the New York Times printed that. Kivie mostly stopped picking his nose in 1985.

Kyle Armbrust, viola

Kyle Armbrust, viola

Kyle Armbrust started playing the viola at age three. Since giving his New York solo debut with Kurt Masur and the Juilliard Orchestra in Avery Fisher Hall, he has created a multi-dimensional career performing and recording a wide range of music. The New York Times has described him as “assured, brilliant, and stylish…” and the New York Post called him “musically mature, technically sound...”

As soloist, Kyle has performed with The Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, St. Petersburg Philharmonic, Lake George Chamber Orchestra, Maple City Chamber Orchestra, and Woodstock Festival Orchestra.

An active proponent of contemporary music, Kyle has worked with Elliot Carter, Mario Davidovsky, Osvaldo Golijov, Steve Reich, Charles Wuorinen, and others. He first performed with the International Contemporary Ensemble in 2011 as part of the Tully SCOPE Festival, then again in Chicago at the Museum of Contemporary Art, and he participated in the Carlos Iturralde ICElab in February 2012. Kyle also performs with Argento Ensemble and the Orchestra of the League of Composers. In addition to his other activities, Kyle is currently the assistant principal viola of the New Jersey Symphony, principal viola of the Westchester Philharmonic, and a founding member of the Knights Chamber Orchestra. He is a substitute member of the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, and Philadelphia Orchestra.

Kyle’s dedication to chamber music has led to festival appearances at Aix en Provence, Caramoor, Charlottesville, La Jolla Summerfest, Marlboro, Monadnock, Moritzburg, Ravinia, Schleswig Holstein, Stillwater, and Verbier. He has performed at Bargemusic, the Gardner Museum, Freer Gallery, New York Yacht Club, Neue Gallerie, and the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. Kyle has also worked with Herbie Hancock, Lauryn Hill, Mya, Sufjan Stevens, Sting, and made an appearance on the show "30 Rock."

Kyle received his BM, MM, and Artist Diploma from The Juilliard School where he studied with Heidi Castleman, Misha Amory, and Michael Tree. He has recorded for Ancalagon, Cedille, Interscope, Naxos, Ondine, and Sony. Kyle plays a Carlo Antonio Testore viola made in Milan in 1752 and plugs in with a DPA 4099V.

“Armbrust's viola tone was an artful chameleon…”

--expressmilwaukee.com

Wendy Richman, viola

Wendy Richman, viola

Founding ICE violist Wendy Richman has been hailed by The New York Times and The Washington Post for her “absorbing,” “fresh and idiomatic” performances with “a brawny vitality.” Upon hearing her interpretation of Berio’s Sequenza VI, The Baltimore Sun commented that she made “something at once dramatic and poetic out of the aggressive tremolo-like motif of the piece.” She has been featured as a soloist and chamber musician across the U.S. and Europe, performing at international festivals of Berlin, Darmstadt, Edinburgh, Helsinki, Hong Kong, Morelia, Rome, and Vienna.She has been featured in the premieres of hundreds of works, notably pieces for singing violist by Jason Eckardt, Arlene Sierra, Ken Ueno, and more. Wendy has collaborated with fortepianist Malcolm Bilson, the Claremont Trio, and members of the Cleveland, Juilliard, and Takács Quartets. She is a frequent guest with the viola sections of the Atlanta Symphony, Minnesota Orchestra, and St. Louis Symphony. Her critically acclaimed recordings can be heard on Albany Records, Between the Lines, Bloodshot Records, BMOP/sound, Mode Records, NAXOS, New Focus, New World, and Tzadik. A respected educator, Wendy has held teaching positions at the University of Alabama and Cornell University, as well as Sewanee Summer Music Festival and Music in the Mountains Conservatory.

Wendy graduated from Oberlin Conservatory (BM), New England Conservatory (MM), and Eastman School of Music (DMA). She studied viola with Carol Rodland, Kim Kashkashian, Peter Slowik, Jeffrey Irvine, and Sara Harmelink, and voice with Marlene Ralis Rosen, Judith Kellock, and Mary Galbraith.Through her vox/viola project, loosely inspired by Giacinto Scelsi’s Manto III, she has commissioned numerous composers to write pieces in which she sings and plays simultaneously.

www.wendyrichmanviola.com

banner image by rKAD

Maiya Papach, viola

Maiya Papach, viola

Maiya Papach is acting co-principal viola of The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and served as acting principal last year. She has made frequent national and international appearances as a chamber and orchestral musician, performing both traditional and contemporary repertoire. This past fall, Papach performed Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante with Concertmaster Steven Copes and the SPCO. She is a founding member of the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), which is rapidly establishing itself as one of the leading new music ensembles in the United States. She is also a member of Accordo, a new chamber ensemble in the Twin Cities. Papach has performed across the former Soviet Union with the Da Capo Chamber Players and toured the Philippines with Cultures in Harmony. Prior to joining the SPCO, she performed regularly with the IRIS Orchestra and the New York Philharmonic. In New York, Papach has performed in chamber concerts at Bargemusic, Alice Tully Hall, Merkin Concert Hall, and Miller Theater, among others. As a former member of the Andros and Rothko string quartets, she was a finalist and prizewinner in a number of competitions, including the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition and Concert Artists Guild. Papach has participated in such festivals as Kneisel Hall, Yellow Barn, and the Marlboro Music Festival. In addition, she performs with Musicians from Marlboro, the touring extension of the festival. Papach is a graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory and the Juilliard School and has studied with Roland Vamos, Karen Tuttle, Benny Kim, and Hsin-Yun Huang.

Josh Modney, violin and viola

Josh Modney, violin and viola

Josh Modney is a NYC-based violinist, violist, and improviser dedicated to performing contemporary music, collaborating closely with composers on new work over extended time periods, and exploring adventurous interpretations of the standard repertoire. A “superb violinist” and “new-music luminary” hailed for “brash, energetic performances” (The New York Times), Josh has performed as a soloist and chamber musician at festivals and concert series across four continents, presented hundreds of premieres, and worked closely with major figures including Mathias Spahlinger, Helmut Lachenmann, George Lewis, Christian Wolff, and Peter Ablinger.

In addition to his membership in ICE, Josh is violinist and Executive Director of the Wet Ink Ensemble, a unique collection of composers, improvisers, and interpreters committed to making adventurous music, lauded for "dense, wild, yet artfully controlled" performances (The New York Times), "combining striking stylistic and aesthetic assurance with technical perfection" (Torsten Möller, Dissonanz). Josh performed internationally with the Mivos Quartet for eight years, a vital new-music string quartet that he co-founded in 2008.

Josh’s repertoire encompasses a wide range, from J.S Bach to seminal Late 20th Century works by Bernard Parmegiani, Luciano Berio and Kaija Saariaho, and new compositions by some of today’s most innovative and exciting composers. Deep collaboration with composers and the long-term development of performance practice for contemporary music is a focus of Josh’s activities, and he has developed new work with artists including Kate Soper, Alex Mincek, Eric Wubbels, Sam Pluta, Rick Burkhardt, Andrew Greenwald and Scott Wollschleger, among others. Josh’s interests include Just Intonation and psycho-acoustic phenomena, extended playing techniques, and performance with live electronics. As an improviser, Josh has appeared with performers including Nate Wooley, Sam Pluta, ZS, and Patrick Higgins.

An active recording artist, Josh’s credits include albums on Carrier Records, Deutsche Grammophon, hat[now]ART, Tzadik, Sacred Bones, and Ex Cathedra. He holds degrees from the Manhattan School of Music (M.M. in contemporary performance) and Ithaca College.

Photo Credit: Alexander Perrelli

Jennifer Curtis, violin

Jennifer Curtis, violin

Violinist Jennifer Curtis navigates with personality and truth in every piece she performs. Her second solo concert in Carnegie Hall was described by the New York Times as “one of the gutsiest and most individual recital programs,” and she was celebrated as “an artist of keen intelligence and taste, well worth watching out for.”

An improviser, composer, and multi-instrumentalist, Curtis is a member of the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) and founder of the group Tres Americas Ensemble. She has appeared as a soloist with the Simon Bolivar Orchestra in Venezuela and the Knights Chamber Orchestra; performed in Romania in honor of George Enescu; given world premieres at the Mostly Mozart Festival in New York; collaborated with composer John Adams at the Library of Congress; and appeared at El Festival de las Artes Esénias in Peru and festivals worldwide. Her compositions have been performed at the Verbier Festival de Musique, El Festival de Artes Escénicas de Lima, throughout the US and include commissions by Cornell University and Paperhand Puppet Intervention. This season she is collaborating with artists ranging from Afro-Peruvian legend Susana Baca, US improviser and visionary Pauline Oliveros, Nrityagram Dance Ensemble, recording a solo CD commemorating the music of George Enescu with a world premiere recording for solo violin and making an album with New York Based improviser/composer/drummer Tyshawn Sorey. This summer she be giving world premieres at Lincoln Center's Mostly Mozart festival in New York City and be the composer/performer in residence with North Carolina's local treasure: Paperhand Puppet Intervention. 

An educator with a focus on music as humanitarian aid, Curtis has also collaborated with musical shamen of the Andes, improvised for live radio from the interior of the Amazon jungle, and taught and collaborated with Kurdish refugees in Turkey. She joins the Haw River Ballroom’s Culture Mill in Saxapahaw, North Carolina as artist in residence this fall, and is teaching improvisation at Duke University. She has held her “Musicianship and the Art of Interpretation” workshop for string players at Oberlin Conservatory, San Francisco Conservatory, and Cornell University. She also incorporated its underlying principles into her classes during her tenure as a Visiting Professor of Music at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

This winter she travels to India to compose and collaborate with Nrityagram Dance Company.

Curtis plays on a 1777 Vincenzo Panormo.

Jennifercurtisviolin.com 

Erik Carlson, violin

Erik Carlson, violin

Erik Carlson has performed as a soloist and with many chamber and orchestral ensembles throughout Europe and the Americas. He is a highly active performer of contemporary music and has had works written for him by numerous composers, including Karlheinz Stockhausen, Tom Johnson, Jürg Frey, and Georges Aperghis. Mr. Carlson is an enthusiastic proponent of interdisciplinary collaboration, and performs frequently with poets, dancers, actors, and film.

He is a member of the International Contemporary Ensemble and the Talea Ensemble and is the founder of the New York Miniaturist Ensemble. He has been featured on over a dozen recordings, including his own two recent albums of music for violin. Also a composer, he has had his musical compositions performed in a wide variety of venues. He studied violin with Jorja Fleezanis, Ronald Copes, and Robert Mann, and holds a Master's degree from The Juilliard School. Mr. Carlson enjoys expensive bourbon and long walks on the beach.

David Bowlin, violin

David Bowlin, violin

Founding ICE violinist David Bowlin has won recognition as an passionate and accomplished interpreter of a wide-ranging repertoire. Among his performances are dozens of premieres, including the 2007 Weill Hall world premiere of Mahagoni, a violin concerto written for him by Alexandra Karastoyanova-Hermentin, and the 2016 Lincoln Center world premiere of Marcos Balter’s Violin Concerto. 

In addition to his work with ICE, Bowlin is a member of the Oberlin Trio and a former member of the Naumburg Award-winning Da Capo Chamber Players, whose CD of music by Chinary Ung won a 2010 NPR Top 5 American Classical Albums award.  In recent seasons Bowlin’s varied activities have included tours with Musicians from Marlboro, performing as guest concertmaster with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Iris Orchestra, and performing with members of the Juilliard and Emerson string quartets.  Accolades include first prize in violin at the Washington International Competition and the 2007 Samuel Baron Prize from Stony Brook University.

Bowlin’s performances have been frequently heard on air, including broadcasts on NPR’s Performance Today with pianist Richard Goode, and live broadcasts on New York’s WQXR, WFMT Chicago, Vermont Public Radio, and WCLV Cleveland.  Recent recordings include a CD of solo works and concerti by Huang Ruo and Luciano Berio for Oberlin Music, a solo and duo CD of music by Roger Sessions on the Bridge label, and piano trios by Dvorak, Shostakovich, and Joan Tower with the Oberlin Trio.  

Bowlin currently serves on the violin faculty of the Oberlin Conservatory of Music and in the summers teaches at the Bowdoin International Music Festival and the Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival.  He also serves as Artistic Director of Chamber Music Quad Cities.  He is a graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory, the Juilliard School, and Stony Brook University, where his principal teachers were Roland and Almita Vamos, Ronald Copes, Pamela Frank, Ani Kavafian, Philip Setzer, and Stephen and Kimberly Sims.  

Steven Schick, Artist in Residence (2012-2015)

Steven Schick, Artist in Residence (2012-2015)

Percussionist, conductor, and author Steven Schick was born in Iowa and raised in a farming family. For the past thirty years he has championed contemporary percussion music as a performer and teacher, by commissioning and premiering more than one hundred new works for percussion. He was the percussionist of the Bang on a Can All-Stars of New York City from 1992-2002, and from 2000 to 2004 served as Artistic Director of the Centre International de Percussion de Genève in Geneva, Switzerland. Schick is founder and Artistic Director of the percussion group, red fish blue fish. In 2007 he was named Music Director and conductor of the La Jolla Symphony and Chorus. Schick founded and is currently artistic director of “Roots and Rhizomes,” an annual summer course on contemporary percussion music held at the Banff Centre for the Arts. In 2011 he was named the Artistic Director of the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players. Recent publications include a book on solo percussion music, “The Percussionist’s Art: Same Bed, Different Dreams, a 3 CD set of the complete percussion music of Iannis Xenakis (Mode) and a 2012 DVD release of the early percussion music of Karlheinz Stockhausen. Steven Schick is Distinguished Professor of Music at the University of California, San Diego. In 2012 he became the first ever Artist in Residence with the International Contemporary Ensemble.

Alice Teyssier, flute, Artistic Operations Associate / Co-Director, OpenICE

Alice Teyssier, flute, Artistic Operations Associate / Co-Director, OpenICE

Flutist and soprano Alice Teyssier brings “something new, something fresh, but also something uncommonly beautiful” to her performances. She has appeared with the San Diego Symphony, the Palimpsest Ensemble, the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) and is regularly featured on Los Angeles’ renowned Monday Evening Concerts series. A uniquely gifted advocate for new music, Alice has given residencies for composers and performers of new music at such universities as Harvard, Leeds, Huddersfield, Oberlin and SUNY- Buffalo.

She has premiered dozens of works and appeared at the Ojai, Mostly Mozart, June in Buffalo, and Huddersfield Contemporary Music festivals. Equally devoted to historically informed and technically sound performances of early music, she performs regularly with the Bach Collegium San Diego and the Pacific Bach Project and is a core member of the Musical Oratory. Born in Australia, Alice has lived in France, the United States and Germany and enjoys a rich performance schedule as a professional flutist as well as a singer.

She has earned degrees from the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, the Conservatoire de Strasbourg and is currently a candidate for Doctor of Musical Arts at UCSD, where she studies with the Grammy-winning soprano Susan Narucki.

Ryan Muncy, saxophone, Grants Director / Co-Director, OpenICE

Ryan Muncy, saxophone, Grants Director / Co-Director, OpenICE

Praised for "superb" performances by The New York Times as well as his ability to "show off the instrument's malleability and freakish extended range as well as its delicacy and refinement" by The Chicago Reader, Ryan Muncy is a saxophonist who performs, commissions, and presents new music. His work emphasizes collaborative relationships with composers and artists of his generation and aims to reimagine the way listeners experience the saxophone through contemporary music. He is a recipient of the Claire Rosen and Samuel Edes Foundation Prize for Emerging Artists as well as a Fulbright Fellowship and has participated in the creation of more than 100 new works for the instrument. His debut solo album Hot was released by New Focus Recordings in 2013 to critical acclaim, praised as "absorbing" (Alex Ross) and "one of the year's best albums" (Time Out New York). 

Before joining the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) as saxophonist and Grants Manager, Muncy was, from 2010 to 2014, the executive director of the Chicago-based new music collective Ensemble Dal Niente. Under his leadership, Dal Niente was named the first-ever ensemble recipient of the Kranichstein Music Prize, awarded at the 46th International Summer Courses for New Music in Darmstadt, Germany. Muncy is also a founding member of Anubis Quartet, a multi-faceted chamber group established in 2007 with the aim of reshaping the saxophone quartet genre. During that time, the quartet has commissioned more than 40 new works and remains one of few worldwide in which all four players perform regularly on the entire battery of saxophones. 

He performs frequently at international festivals and series, including Wien Modern, Internationale Ferienkurse für Neue Musik Darmstadt, Ecstatic Music Festival, MATA's Interval Series, Liquid Music at the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra Center, Unruly Music, Festival Internacional Chihuahua, The Fromm Concert Series at Harvard, SALT New Music Festival, MusicArte Panamá, World Saxophone Congresses in Bangkok and Montreal, and the Ear Heart Music Series in New York as well as classical radio stations WQXR (New York) and WFMT (Chicago). Muncy performs regularly with the Talea Ensemble and the Grant Park Symphony, and has held numerous residencies and conducted arts management workshops at universities and cultural institutions across North America and abroad. 

In 2012, Muncy received the Doctor of Music degree from Northwestern University's Bienen School of Music, where he studied with Frederick L. Hemke. A devoted educator and pedagogue, Muncy previously served on Northern Illinois University's School of Music faculty as an instructor of saxophone and music business.

www.ryannmuncy.com

Rebekah Heller, bassoon, Director of Individual Giving

Rebekah Heller, bassoon, Director of Individual Giving

Praised for her “flair” and “deftly illuminated” performances by The New York Times, bassoonist Rebekah Heller is a uniquely dynamic chamber, orchestral and solo musician. Equally comfortable playing established classical works and the newest of new music, Rebekah is a fiercely passionate advocate for the bassoon. Called an "impressive solo bassoonist" by The New Yorker, she is tirelessly committed to collaborating with composers to expand the modern repertoire for the instrument.

Her debut solo album of world premiere recordings, 100 names, has been called "pensive and potent" by the New York Times and was featured in the ArtsBeat Classical Playlist of the same publication. As a core member of the renowned International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), Rebekah plays solo and chamber music all over the world. She has been a featured soloist with the Seattle Symphony Orchestra and the Nagoya Philharmonic and has performed in cities both near and far –  including São Paolo, Rio, Manaus, Tokyo, Paris, Berlin, Köln, Salzburg, Chicago, New York, Boston, San Francisco, Minneapolis, and many, many more.

A graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory, Rebekah lives in Brooklyn, NY.
More info and performance videos can be found at rebekahheller.com

Portrait photo credit Carrie Schneider

Jacob Greenberg, piano, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach

Jacob Greenberg, piano, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach

Pianist Jacob Greenberg’s work as a soloist and chamber musician has earned worldwide acclaim.  As a longtime member of the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), he has performed throughout North and South Americas and Europe.  His solo concert series, Music at Close Range, shows his equal commitment to classics of the repertoire.

With ICE, Mr. Greenberg introduces young people to new music in public schools across the country.  He currently teaches piano at Hunter College, and has also taught at the State University of New York at Buffalo.  He is a graduate of Oberlin College, where he earned degrees in music and religion, and he completed his master's and doctoral degrees at Northwestern University, where he studied with Ursula Oppens.

A leading pianist of modern song, he has toured extensively with soprano Tony Arnold; their 2013 recording of Olivier Messiaen's Harawi has been singled out by critics.  Other ensemble performances include MusicNOW, with members of the Chicago Symphony, and Contempo at the University of Chicago.  As an orchestral player, he has also appeared with the New York Philharmonic and the Israel Philharmonic.

Mr. Greenberg has recorded for the Bridge, Naxos, Mode, Kairos, Centaur, Tzadik, and New Amsterdam labels, and live performances have been heard on WQXR New York, BBC Radio 3, WFMT Chicago and Radio Netherlands.  His critically acclaimed debut solo disc, Solitary, was released on New Focus Recordings.  Other CDs include solo and chamber music of George Crumb with ICE (Bridge 9261) and a disc pairing Schumann and Ferruccio Busoni.  Mr. Greenberg is also a record producer, and has completed discs for major domestic and international labels.

Recent highlights include a guest performance of works of György Kurtág at the International Summer Courses in Darmstadt, Germany; a recital tour with flutist Claire Chase; a Messiaen concert at the Library of Congress; and Harrison Birtwistle's Slow Frieze with conductor Ludovic Morlot at Lincoln Center's Mostly Mozart Festival.

www.jacobgreenberg.net
Photo Credits: Gus Powell

 

 

 

 

Ross Karre, percussion, Co-Artistic Director

Ross Karre, percussion, Co-Artistic Director

Ross Karre (b. 1983 in Battle Creek, MI) is a percussionist and temporal artist based in New York City. His primary focus is the combination of media selected from classical percussion, electronics, theater, moving image, visual art, and lighting design. After completing his Doctorate in Music at UCSD with Steven Schick, Ross formalized his intermedia studies with a Master of Fine Arts from UCSD. He has worked closely with composers from around the world such as Pierre Boulez, Helmut Lachenmann, and Harrison Birtwistle in N. America, S. America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Ross is a percussionist for the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) and performs regularly with red fish blue fish, Third Coast Percussion (Chicago), the National Gallery of Art New Music Ensemble (DC), and many others. His projection design and video art has been presented in numerous prestigious venues around the world including the BBC Scotland (Glasgow Concert Halls), the Park Avenue Armory (NYC), Miller Theater (NYC), the National Gallery of Art (Washington, DC), and the BIMhuis (Holland). Ross is the founder and owner of a growing arts documentation business called rKAD specializing in video and audio recordings of performing arts.

Joshua Rubin, clarinet, Co-Artistic Director

Joshua Rubin, clarinet, Co-Artistic Director

Joshua Rubin is a founding clarinetist and the co-Artistic Director of the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), where he oversees the creative direction of more than one hundred concerts per season in the United States and abroad. As a clarinetist, the New York Times has praised him as, "incapable of playing an inexpressive note."

Joshua has worked closely with many of the prominent composers of our time, including George Crumb, David Lang, John Adams, George Lewis, Kaija Saariaho, John Zorn, Magnus Lindberg, Steve Lehman, Nathan Davis, Tyshawn Sorey, John Zorn, and Mario Davidovsky. His interest in electronic music throughout his career has led him work on making these technologies easier to use for both composers and performers. Joshua can be heard on recordings from the Nonesuch, Kairos, New Focus, Mode, Cedille, Naxos, Bridge, New Amsterdam, and Tzadik labels. His album "There Never is No Light," available on ICE's Tundra label, highlights music that uses technology to capture the human engagement of the performer and the listener.

Recently he has been featured as a soloist with the Seattle Symphony (under Ludovic Morlot), at the Ojai Music Festival, at the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center, in engagements with the Nagoya Philharmonic Orchestra and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, and has given solo performances of new music in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, São Paulo, Rome and Berlin.

He received degrees in Biology and Clarinet from Oberlin College and Conservatory, and his Master's degree from the Mannes College of Music. His clarinet studies were mentored by Lawrence McDonald, Mark Nuccio and Yehuda Gilad.

 

rubin(at)iceorg.org

Action photo by Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Claire Chase, flute, Founder

Claire Chase, flute, Founder

"Look out world, here comes a monster." - American Record Guide

Claire Chase, described by The New Yorker as "the young star of the modern flute," is a soloist, collaborative artist, curator and advocate for new and experimental music. Over the past decade she has given the world premieres of hundreds of new works for the flute in performances throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia, and she has championed new music throughout the world by building organizations, forming alliances, pioneering commissioning initiatives and supporting educational programs that reach new audiences. She was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2012.

Chase has released three celebrated solo albums, Aliento (2010), Terrestre (2012) andDensity (2013), and in 2014 launched Density 2036, a 22-year commissioning project to create an entirely new body of repertory for solo flute between 2014 and 2036, the centenary of Edgard Varèse’s groundbreaking 1936 flute solo, Density 21.5. She was the 2009 Grand Prize Winner of the Concert Artists Guild International Competition, and made her critically-acclaimed Carnegie Hall recital debut in 2010.

In 2014, Chase was named an inaugural Fellow at Project&: Cultural Production with Social Impact. With Project&, she will develop several large-scale new works from 2014-2018 exploring the relationship between language, ritual and music. In 2015, Chase was music director and soloist in Salvatore Sciarrino’s Il Cerchio Tagliato dei Suoni for 104 flutes, for which the Los Angeles Times praised her as a “staggering virtuoso with the assurance of a rock star.” She will lead several performances in 2016-17 of this immersive 60-minute piece fusing contemporary performance and community engagement. 

Upcoming projects include solo tours in Asia, Australia and the Middle East, a residency with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, performances of Dai Fujikura's new flute concerto, and the release of a new double-album in collaboration with Meyer Sound Studios in Fall 2016. At home in New York, she will perform at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and Lincoln Center, as well as with ICE in community venues, public spaces, and elementary schools as part of the OpenICE initiative.

Claire co-founded ICE in 2001 and plays more than fifty concerts a year as an ensemble member. She lives in Brooklyn.

Read more at www.clairechase.net